Neuron interviews Big Questions in Neuroscience speakers


Kia Nobre

Kia Nobre, Oxford, UK

Kia Nobre uses MRI, MEG, and EEG to study how the human brain proactively and dynamically guides perception and cognition based on goals, expectations, and memories. In her recent interview with Neuron, she talks about science being a social and political endeavor that somehow lost its street credit, advocates focusing on questions instead of quick answers, and confesses that nothing beats the thrill of an unexpected discovery.

Published Neuron Volume 96, Issue 1, p11–13, 27 September 2017
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J. Paul Taylor

David Rowitch, Cambridge, UK

David Rowitch is a physician-scientist studying developmental genetics of glia in health and disease. In his interview with Neuron, he talks about the importance of single-cell and whole-genome sequencing and the need for raw data sharing and tissue banks encompassing human brain development and disease, and encourages active crosstalk between basic scientists and clinicians.

Published Neuron Volume 95, Issue 6, p1240–1241, 13 September 2017
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Earl Miller

Earl Miller, MIT, USA

Earl Miller studies the neural basis of high-level cognitive functions. In an interview with Neuron, he discusses the need for a holistic approach to figure out the brain, how ideas don’t happen in a vacuum, and the challenge of convincing the public that science produces facts; he also shares an open invitation to see Pavlov’s Dogz.

Published Neuron Volume 95, Issue 6, p1237–1239, 13 September 2017
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Josef  Parvizi

Chenghua Gu, Harvard Medical School, USA

Chenghua Gu studies the interactions between the vascular and the nervous system. In her interview with Neuron, she shares her thoughts on how crosstalk between disciplines helps generate new ideas and technologies, advocates for science education to nurture wisdom and creativity, and discusses ”discovery-based research” and American football in her department.

Published Neuron Volume 95, Issue 5, p996–998, 30 August 2017
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J. Paul Taylor

Paul Taylor, St. Jude, USA

J. Paul Taylor is a pioneer in the field examining how disruptions in intrinsically disordered segments in proteins perturb phase transitions and underlie neurological diseases, such as ALS. In his recent interview with Neuron, he shares how understanding first principles of biology is essential for disease therapy development, why “fishing expeditions” are his favorite experiments, and how he overcame NIH budget cuts when starting his lab.

Published Neuron Volume 95, Issue 5, p996–998, 30 August 2017
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Horvath

Tamas Horvath, Yale School of Medicine, USA

Tamas Horvath, Yale School of Medicine, USA, studies how the brain controls energy metabolism and how the peripheral tissue governs a multitude of complex behaviors. In his interview, he shares his “eureka” moment, talks about the blurred boundaries of science and art, and questions the neuronal doctrine as a sufficient conceptual framework, advocating for an in-depth interaction between researchers to learn from each other in the quest to pursue the unknown

Published Neuron Volume 95, Issue 4, p738–740, 16 August 2017
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Gina  Turrigiano

Gina Turrigiano, Brandeis University, USA

Gina Turrigiano, Brandeis University, USA, works on homeostatic plasticity mechanisms and understanding how central microcircuits are fine-tuned by experience. In her Q&A, she discusses the need for collaboration and exposure between disciplines, the “joy of discovery,” and how the scientific system might benefit from a little homeostasis.

Published Neuron Volume 95, Issue 4, p741–742, 16 August 2017
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Sabine  Kastner

Sabine Kastner, Princeton, USA

Sabine Kastner, Princeton, USA, is a cognitive neuroscientist with contributions to a wide variety of topics including visual perception, attention, and awareness. In her Neuron interview, she shares how her “80s research” on the thalamus turned out to be very cool, the importance of inter-disciplinary teams, and how scientists can give back to society.

Published Neuron Volume 95, Issue 3, p486–489, 2 August 2017
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Graeme  Davis

Graeme Davis, University of California, San Francisco, USA

In his Q&A, Graeme Davis, University of California, San Francisco, USA, a pioneer in the field of homeostatic plasticity, shares his thoughts on the future of his field and the role of homeostatic plasticity in development, disease, and aging, the power of “global neuroscience,” and how people trained in different fields can bring new ideas and talent to the bench.

Published Neuron Volume 95, Issue 2, p242–244, 19 July 2017
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Josef  Parvizi

Josef Parvizi, Stanford, USA

In his Neuron interview, Josef Parvizi, Stanford, USA, discusses the role of neuromodulation, the potential of “electroceuticals” and electrical stimulation for the future of clinical neurosciences, the problem of “corticocentric myopia,” and finding inspiration and excitement in working with talented young students

Published Neuron Volume 95, Issue 1, p12–13, 5 July 2017
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